I am a white cis woman in my thirties. I blog about art, mathematics, politics, and whatever else I feel like. You can search for art, drawings, math, comments, tarot, yams, or neolalia.

 

Both my job talk and my interview went very well as far as I could tell.  They said they’d be letting people know in about a week.

My job talk is on Monday and the interview is on Tuesday.  Followers, please cross your fingers for me. 

[cw: self harm urges]

Followers, I need to go back off again.  I don’t know for how long.  In the past I have ignored danger signs about my mental wellness until I’m past the breaking point; I don’t want that to happen any more so it’s time to make radical changes before I start hurting myself again.

I am 99% sure I will be back someday, maybe before too long.  I get a lot out of being on tumblr and I think some of my activity on here is meaningful. 

Until whenever I come back I am wishing so many good things for my followers.  I love you and want lots of good things to happen to you. 

Bye for now. <3

The anxiety takes two forms this morning.  One is a roaring rain of ash that drowns the senses.  The other is a wild iridescent ocean of blue, green and gold whose enormous waves make a noise like SSSSHHHREEEENNNG like a sword being unsheathed.  My boat is the size of a pinprick; it does not capsize but my arms and legs are wrapped around the mast as the singing waves toss it back and forth.

I have gotten through much worse than this, and I know I can get through this.

A sheet I made in 2010 to try to get better at noticing and recognizing feelings and states of mind.

A sheet I made in 2010 to try to get better at noticing and recognizing feelings and states of mind.

Job update: I keep saying “my interview will happen soon” and it keeps not happening.  I got an email last night from one of the heads of the Lectureship Committee telling me that the Committee’s been held up by another matter that’s taking a lot longer than they thought it would.  So they’re not blowing me off, it’s just bureaucracy.  So anyway, it’s still in the future and I’m done saying “it should happen soon”; it happens when it happens, and that’s fine. 

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Representation in STEM: Black Women Making Their Mark in Space and Science

Today, there is an increased push for the American education system to improve their STEM programs as well as to get students to show interest in the fields. It is important to bring attention to some of the African-American females that have, and are still, paving the road for future scientists, astronauts or any STEM degree holders.

These women are just some of the many examples of African-American contributions to science. (Descriptions pertain to the women in the order they appear on the photoset, from up down, left right)

Mercedes Richards PH.D is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Originally from Jamaica, Dr. Richards received her Doctoral degree at the University of Toronto. In 2010 Dr. Richards received the Fulbright Award to conduct research at the Astronomical Institute in Slovakia. research focus is on binary stars; twin stars formed at the same time.

Willie Hobbs Moore PH.D is the first African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics in 1972. She received it at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Her thesis research involved important problems in vibrational analysis of macro molecules.

Beth Brown PH.D (1969-2008) was an Astrophysicist in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Born in Roanoke, VA, she grew up watching Star Trek and Star Wars and was fascinated with space. In 1998, Dr. Brown becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein PH.D is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the Observational Lab in Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. Originally from Los Angeles California Dr. Prescod-Weinstein specializes in theoretical cosmology.

Dara Norman PH.D is a professor at the University of Washington. Dr. Norman grew up in the south side of Chicago Illinois. She went to MIT as an Undergraduate and worked at NASA Goddard in Maryland. Dr. Norman currently specializes in gravitational lensing, large scale structure and quasars (quasi-stellar objects). This year she was honored with the University’s Timeless Award for her contributions and accomplishments to astronomy. In 2009 she was invited to the Star Party at the White House.

Jeanette J. Epps PH.D from Syracuse NY is a NASA astronaut. She received her PH.D in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Marylan in 2000. Dr. Epps was selected in 2009 to be one of the 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training.

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics and the first from MIT. In 2009 Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She is currently the President of the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute.

Flag Counter